NAVIGATION

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In the spirit of Halloween here's a spooky trick we learned, many moons ago, on The Magic School Bus:

J *For educational purposes only, no copyright infringement intended.* J

© 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc. 

The Magic School Bus: "Gets a Bright Idea" episode synopsis:
Arnold's cousin, Janet, was disappointed by the all-school field trip to a light show, as she wanted to see a magic show. She tells the class she could do a magic trick, but she can't because of the ghost that haunts the theater. When they leave, they find Arnold missing. When they enter again, they see his "ghost". Keesha, the skeptic, is convinced that it is really a trick done by Janet to scare them. 
   © 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.                          © 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.

   © 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.                          © 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.

At the end of the episode, the producer reveals this ghostly light trick:
Ah, it's an old magician's trick called 'Pepper's Ghost'. You can Do It Yourself, you know.
© 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.

1) First you take a cardboard box and paint the inside black.

© 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.


2) Make a medium sized window in one side of the box so you can see in.

© 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.

3) Make a window out of plastic or stretch some plastic wrap across a cardboard window
    frame so it can fit in the box on a slant.

   © 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.                          © 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.

4) Take your ghost object, put it on the floor of the box then close up the box.

© 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.                          © 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.

5) Now make another hole in the box so the light from a flashlight can shine on your ghost
    object without lighting up the back of the box.

© 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.                          © 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.

6) Turn the light on, you'll see a reflection of your object on the plastic, making a ghost appear
    in the back of the box.

© 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.                          © 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.

7) Turn the light off, and your handsome ghost disappears because there's no light from the reflection.

© 1996 Scholastic Productions, Inc.

...but remember, the better-looking the ghost, the better the trick. 

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 17:52 CST  

Here we present our DIY: Pinhole Projector used to see the Partial Solar Eclipse on October 23, 2014 via Central Standard Time (CST) based in North Dallas. Note the distinct cast of lunar umbra on the sun. 

Did anyone else have the privilege to see the solar eclipse as well? Mesmerizing to consider the cosmic alignment of orbital motion. Yet a partial eclipse is askew, not in absolute aliment. Still it presents a glimpse of a moment that passes by, so fleeting, the recognition of positions relative to another; the sun, the moon and earth. Regard to the next worldwide Total Solar Eclipse expected to occur next year on March 20, 2015, while the upcoming Total Solar Eclipse visible in Texas is expected until August 21, 2017.

 17:12 CST                                           17:28 CST

  17:44 CST                                           18:06 CST

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Partial Solar Eclipse on October 23, 2014 visible to the Northern Hemisphere, predominately in East Asia and North America. The Time and Date of the eclipse by worldwide location may be found here or by city in the US here. Nonetheless, please be advised not to look directly into the eclipse without proper precaution! Luckily, I happened to recall learning the proper way to view a solar eclipse on an episode of Recess:

J *For educational purposes only, no copyright infringement intended.* J

© 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc. 

Recess: "Outcast Ashley" episode synopsis:
"Ashley A. is thrown out of the Ashley's for committing a major social faux pas. No longer repressing her interest in astronomy, she starts to hang out with Gretchen and gives her fashion advice while they both await the arrival of an upcoming total solar eclipse.

   © 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc.                                      © 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc.

   © 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc.                                      © 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc.

Without further ado, Gretchen Grundler will demonstrate this DIY:
Make a Pinhole Projector so we can view the upcoming solar eclipse. You can't look at an eclipse with the naked eye, you know, it'll scorch your retina. You need a special viewing apparatus like the one we are going to build. 

© 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc. 

1) Supplies include the following: cardboard box, compass, french curve, scissors,
    straight edge, carbon paper, glue, cellophane tape, paper clips and pen.

   © 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc.                                      © 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc.

2) All we have to do is poke a pinhole on a side of the box and cut a slant in the other.
    Poke a hole in the carbon paper with a paper clip and tape it over the pinhole. Create
    a viewing window by gluing transparent cellophane over the slant.

   © 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc.                                      © 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc.

3) This isn't a step, this is just Gretchen and Ashely A. casually walking into the sunset.

   © 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc.

4) Reassemble the box and fashionably decorate for much needed ~ Ashley ~ statement.
    Then place the box such that the pinhole is directly facing the solar eclipse.

   © 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc.                                      © 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc.

5) The light shines through the pinhole on the opposite side and when you look through
     the slant, you see the eclipse's projected shadow inside the box. Neat, huh?!?

   © 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc.                                      © 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc.

Now a Partial Solar Eclipse will only be a sliver of a glimpse, but still all magnificent!

© 1997 Disney Enterprises, Inc. 

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